FILM & TV GLOSSARY

UKFILMNET FILM & TELEVISION PRODUCTION GLOSSARY



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L

language

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
in semiotics, cinema is considered a language because it is a means of communication, but it is not necessarily a language system because it does not follow the rules of written or spoken language.

lapel Mic

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
A lapel microphone or lavalier (or lav mic) is a small electret or dynamic microphone used for television, theatre, film and public speaking applications, in order to allow hands-free operation.

They are most commonly provided with small clips for attaching to collars, ties, or other clothing. The cord may be hidden by clothes and either run to a radio frequency transmitter in a pocket or clipped to a belt (for mobile work), or directly to the mixer (for stationary applications).

lavalier Mic

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
lapel microphone or lavalier (or lav mic) is a small electret or dynamic microphone used for television, theatre, film and public speaking applications, in order to allow hands-free operation.

They are most commonly provided with small clips for attaching to collars, ties, or other clothing. The cord may be hidden by clothes and either run to a radio frequency transmitter in a pocket or clipped to a belt (for mobile work), or directly to the mixer (for stationary applications).

Lighting diagram

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
A lighting diagram, whether hand drawn or using computer software, is an illustration or diagram that explains (usually in plan view) the layout, types of lighting and lighting modification and camera position of a particular lighting composition. Although there are no universally agreed symbols, there are nonetheless, some widely agreed symbolic conventions representing different types of light and modification.

lighting practicals

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
Lighting practicals are a collective term for any single or number of lights that can seen by an audience within shot and which (usually but not always) originate light that is used in the final scene. Examples of lighting practicals include bed side table lamps, candles, desk lamps, torches (flash lights) and indeed any form of lighting where it is evidence to the audience that the light might naturally be expected to come from such light sources.

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