FILM & TV GLOSSARY

UKFILMNET FILM & TELEVISION PRODUCTION GLOSSARY



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B

backlighting

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
lighting cast onto the figures from the side opposite the camera. It creates a thin outline of light on the figures' edge.

barn doors

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
Barn doors are an attachment fitted to the front of lights used in films, television, and theatres.

The attachment has the appearance of a large set of barn doors, but in fact there are four leaves, two larger and widening on the outside, two smaller and getting narrower towards the outside. They facilitate shaping of the beam of light from the fixture, and prevent the distinctive scatter of light created by the Fresnel lens from spilling into areas where it is not wanted, such as the eyes of audience members. Barn doors are mounted with a ring that fits inside of the colour gel slot on the instrument. Because of this, barn doors have a gel slot built in to them, so the light can still be coloured. Depending on the size and local practices, barn doors may be attached to the pipe or the instrument with their own safety cable.

bird's eye view

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
seeing from a high enough view or altitude as to give a comprehensive view of a scene; also known as aerial view.

boom

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
a pole upon which a microphone can be suspended above the scene is being filmed and which is used to change the microphone's position as the action shifts.

boom mic

(Last edited: Tuesday, 30 July 2013, 4:41 PM)
a boom mic is a type of microphone which is mounted (usually with shock absorbing springs or chords to avoid noises) at the end of a "Boom pole" or "fishing pole" which itself is a long extendable/telescopic pole that allows the Boom Operator to reach OVER a presenter or actor and lower the microphone as close in to a presenter or actors direction of speech but WITHOUT the boom pole or rod (or MIC) appearing in the frame.

The microphone used at the end of the boom pole is USUALLY a "shot-gun" or "directional" microphone which is therefore often called a BOOM Mic

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